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24th Ji.hlava International Documentary Film Festival

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Taego Ãwa
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Taego Ãwa

Taego Ãwa

director: Henrique Borela, Marcela Borela
original title: Taego Ãwa
country: Brazil
year: 2016
running time: 75 min.

synopsis

Tutawa Tuagaek, the ageing leader of the Ãwa, a Brazilian indigenous tribe, is one of the last survivors of the 1973 massacre of Indians in the Amazon jungle. This team of filmmaker-ethnographers records his everyday life in the company of young followers, to whom he is trying to pass on his experiences. The Indian community’s everyday rituals are contrasted with found photographs and video clips that offer rare evidence of the atrocities that Tutawa recounts. Different epochs and visual formats create a continuum that reveals the traumatic history of an oppressed people who have managed to survive despite all odds.

"The imagination is not only mediator between understanding and sensibility, it has its own dynamism, scheme free, organized bodies, constituted individuals, fixed identities, consolidated psyches."

biography

Siblings Henrique (1989) and Marcela (1983) Borel, Brazilian filmmakers, explorers, and festival curators, apply their experiences with social scientific research in their film work: Henrique’s background is in social sciences; Marcela’s is primarily in cultural history. To date, both have made primarily short films, and together have directed, for example, the film Under Our Feet (2015). Taego Ãwa is their first feature-length film.

more about film

director: Henrique Borela, Marcela Borela
producer: Belém de Oliveira
photography: Vinicius Berger
editing: Guile Martins
sound: Belém De Oliveira

other films in the section

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You Can Just Learn It

Abigail Han
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section: Opus Bonum
World Premiere
Wind Shaped Rocks
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Wind Shaped Rocks

Eduardo Makoszay
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section: Opus Bonum
World Premiere
TERRA NULLIUS or: How to be a Nationalist
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TERRA NULLIUS or: How to be a Nationalist

James T. Hong
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section: Opus Bonum
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personal program

Once More unto the Breach

Michele Manzolini, Federico Ferrone
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section: Opus Bonum
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Shahrzaad's Tale
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Shahrzaad's Tale

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section: Opus Bonum
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Disappear One

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The Dazzling Light of Sunset

Salomé Jashi
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section: First Lights
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The Deathless Woman
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The Deathless Woman

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Expectant

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I Crossed the Hallway

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#3511

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Ministerstvo kultury
Fond kinematografie
Evropská unie
Město Jihlava
Kraj Vysočina
Česká televize
Český rozhlas
Aktuálně.cz
Respekt