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24th Ji.hlava International Documentary Film Festival

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The Deathless Woman
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The Deathless Woman
The Deathless Woman
The Deathless Woman
The Deathless Woman

The Deathless Woman

director: Roz Mortimer
original title: The Deathless Woman
country: United Kingdom
year: 2019
running time: 88 min.

synopsis

The far right is on the rise again. Racial intolerance is spreading through real and virtual spaces. Which is why a woman buried alive in the Polish forests during World War II comes back to life to commemorate the history of violence against the Roma. Her “avatar” becomes a young researcher visiting locations in Poland and Hungary where Roma have lost their lives both in the distant and recent past. Thanks to the authentic testimonies and staged passages that blur the line between mystery novel and dreamlike horror, buried secrets come to light serving as both a warning and a reminder.

“An uncanny series of events led me to a Polish forest. Later I found out this place was the forgotten grave of the Deathless Woman. Looking back now, I realize she'd been there all along, guiding me.” R. Mortimer

biography

Roz Mortimer is the author of hybrid documentaries and lives and works in London. She combines film techniques with writing, photography and theatre. She gives lectures on alternative approaches to documentary direction at universities in both the US and the UK. Her works, which are showcased at festivals and galleries around the world, usually carry a strong political stance. In recent years, she has mainly been dealing with the traumatic historical experience of national minorities.

more about film

director: Roz Mortimer
cast: Iveta Kokyová, Loren O'Dair, Oliver Malik
producer: Roz Mortimer

other films in the section

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Coast of Death

Lois Patiño
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section: Opus Bonum
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Things We Do Not Say
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Things We Do Not Say

Ali Razi
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section: Opus Bonum
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Missing
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Missing

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section: Opus Bonum
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The Nature of Things
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The Nature of Things

Laura Viezzoli
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section: Opus Bonum
East European Premiere
The Interceptor from My Hometown
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The Interceptor from My Hometown

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Albâtre
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Albâtre

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29 26

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Lost Paradise

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The Visit

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You Can Just Learn It

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World Premiere
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Until Porn Do Us Part

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personal program

Kiruna – A Brand New World

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Ministerstvo kultury
Fond kinematografie
Evropská unie
Město Jihlava
Kraj Vysočina
Česká televize
Český rozhlas
Aktuálně.cz
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