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24th Ji.hlava International Documentary Film Festival

ji-hlavadok-revuecdfEmerging producersInspiration Forum
Western, Family and Communism
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Western, Family and Communism
Western, Family and Communism
Western, Family and Communism
Western, Family and Communism

Western, Family and Communism

director: Laurent Krief
original title: Western, famille et communisme
country: France
year: 2018
running time: 83 min.

synopsis

The first shots of the film show Parisians demonstrating and protesting, interspersed with shouted political slogans of Iranian activists. While the situation is very heated in Paris, calmness reigns in Iran. A French family is traveling here in a caravan and getting to know the country. The father films footage of their journey including his wife and daughter. The first third of the film suggests that the issue is a national one, namely that of the Iranian citizens, while the remaining two-thirds shows, however, the French on holiday. From a formal point of view, the film comprises interesting shots taken with a handheld camera, as well highly-overexposed, almost white, shots and double exposures. 

„Perhaps politics is the multiple of experiments and inventions in an equation with two unknowns: ‚I‘ and ‚we‘. Rather than solve it, once and for all, it would be a matter of keeping trying. Once again. (Precarious springs of the peoples, Maria Kakogianni, 2017)“ L. Krief

biography

Laurent Krief was born in 1978 in Aubenas, France. He focuses on both filmmaking and teaching secondary school math. His debut documentary, Instructions pour une prize d'armes (2011-2013), was presented at the FIDMarseille festival, the Etats généraux du film documentaire in Lussas, and at DocLisboa. Western, Family and Communism is his second work.

more about film

director: Laurent Krief
producer: Laurent Krief, Marie-Odile Gazin
photography: Laurent Krief
editing: Laurent Krief
sound: Laurent Krief

other films in the section

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Also Known as Jihadi

Eric Baudelaire
France / 2017 / 101 min.
section: Opus Bonum
East European Premiere
Did You Wonder Who Fired the Gun?
In 1946, S.E. Branch clearly shot Bill Spann, a black man, in Alabama. One story of many, it can be said, but this time it’s being unraveled by the great-nephew of the murderer through this political and aesthetically distinctive film essay. During the investigation, he constantly ran in to obstacles, due not only to the prevailing racism, but also the inevitable reflection of his own connection with history. A montage of black and white memories of places, endless drives through red sunsets, and agitating tunes brings the work together in the best southern Gothic tradition, in which “the past is never dead. It’s not even past.” (W. Faulkner)„This time I offered my love and my labor to a film that I wished somehow to be corrective. A film about the worst of my family.” T. Wilkerson

Did You Wonder Who Fired the Gun?

Travis Wilkerson
United States / 2017 / 90 min.
section: Opus Bonum
Central European Premiere
Kiruna – A Brand New World
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personal program

Kiruna – A Brand New World

Greta Stocklassa
Czech Republic / 2019 / 87 min.
section: Opus Bonum
Czech Premiere
One Night Stand
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personal program

One Night Stand

Noor Abed, Mark Lotfy
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section: Opus Bonum
World Premiere
Backstage Action
This is de facto a film about a film, with the only difference being that the focus is exclusively on the extras. They are filmed while waiting to take their turn, while conversing with others, and thinking about their performances. Although they take their duties very seriously and long to be stars, for the filmmakers, they’re just people that can be coordinated as necessary, nothing more. This film, on the contrary, gives them full consideration, revealing their personalities, what they experience, and what they dream of. The footage comes from many different places where movies are made, involving extras from all different nationalities."The representative becomes a present body, a speaking body, he becomes an acting body, even a political body liberated from the stereotypes that pertain to the community he was supposed to represent." S. Azari 

Backstage Action

Sanaz Azari
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section: Opus Bonum
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Notes from Unknown Maladies

Liryc Dela Cruz
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section: Opus Bonum
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Missing

Farahnaz Sharifi
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section: Opus Bonum
World Premiere
Katyusha: Rocket Launchers, Folk Songs, and Ethnographic Refrains
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Katyusha: Rocket Launchers, Folk Songs, and Ethnographic Refrains

Kandis Friesen
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section: Opus Bonum
International Premiere
A Distant Echo
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A Distant Echo

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section: Opus Bonum
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We Make Couples

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section: Opus Bonum
Czech Premiere
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The Nature of Things

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section: Opus Bonum
East European Premiere
NU
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NU

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