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23rd Ji.hlava International Documentary Film Festival

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3 Dreams of Horses
3 Dreams of Horses
3 Dreams of Horses
3 Dreams of Horses

3 Dreams of Horses

director: Mike Hoolboom
original title: 3 Dreams of Horses
country: Canada
year: 2018
running time: 6 min.

synopsis

Raw film material consists in part of gelatin, which is made of the skin and bones of animals, including horses. The traces of light that shape our audiovisual dreams are thus imprinted on parts of animal bodies. Through the subtle use of audio, this found-footage collage focuses on images of the horse as an attraction, an animal of burden, and a mythological creature. 

"In 1900 there were 130,000 working horses in Manhattan. Horses were a central part of our lives. Jeremy Bentham: "The question is not: can they reason? Nor, can they talk? But, can they suffer?" M. Hoolboom

 

biography

Mike Hoolboom (1900) is a leading figure in Canadian experimental film and video who previously worked for the CFMDC distribution company and as artistic director of the Images festival. Besides being the author of numerous books on experimental cinema, he has also written his own novel. He has made more than 80 films and videos, many of which he edits or otherwise alters to create new forms. In 2003, the Ji.hlava IDFF honored him with a retrospective of his work, and last year the festival showed his most recent film Spectator (2017). 

 

more about film

director: Mike Hoolboom
producer: Mike Hoolboom
script: Mike Hoolboom
editing: MIke Hoolboom

other films in the section

The Trembling Giant
A view of the landscape of the American Southwest, where the largest organism on Earth grows – a 60,000-year-old colony of quaking aspens – was filmed with a digital camera through the take-up reel of a 16mm projector in order to emphasize the characteristic effect of projected film material which rhythmically warps the space in front of the projector. Patrick Tarrant (1969) is originally from Melbourne, Australia and teaches at London South Bank University. He is the author of meditative films, that draw on the atmosphere of cities and urban peripheries.“My repurposing of a 16mm film projector warps space in three dimensions in order that we might reflect on our journey from a people who feared the natural world to people who must now fear for the natural world.”

The Trembling Giant

Patrick Tarrant
United Kingdom / 2016 / 19 min.
section: Fascinations
East European Premiere
Double 8
Christiana Perschon shot her meeting with the artist Linda Christanell, a representative of Austria’s feminist avant-garde of the 1970s, on double 8mm fi lm without cutting. When shown, the fi lm’s split image shows footage of the two women fi lming one another to create a dialogue on seeing and being seen. “Every interaction with an image searches for its own form.  Approaching someone with my camera is not a one-way encounter but an act of getting to know each other: I see you seeing me instead of looking at you.” C. Perschon

Double 8

Christiana Perschon
Austria / 2016 / 3 min.
section: Fascinations
International Premiere
Inside
Fragments of a body chiseled from darkness carve out a study of a nude female figure, sensual at specific moments, and in places disappearing into digital darkness. A lyrical treatise on intimacy and secrecy and an implicit polemic with a voyeuristic gaze create a longing for constrained completeness. "I dissect the perception and the mental state that arise while being watched, penetrated and examined and the experience of the viewer, involuntary being forced to follow the gaze of the camera." T. Kjellmark  

Inside

Tove Kjellmark
Sweden / 2018 / 10 min.
section: Fascinations
East European Premiere
Time, why think about it?
The memories of old people at a senior care facility come to life in fragmentary recollections accompanied by photographs of them and their loved ones and the places and events they remember. The ephemeral nature of these memories is visualised by using painting to alter these images of the passing of time. Belgian artist Charlotte Dunker (1987) uses painting techniques in her films, and also experiments with light-sensitive materials. She works with silence as an opportunity for self-reflection and explores the changeable nature of truth in relation to cultural contexts. The Jihlava IDFF previously showed her film Jupiter Lolopop (2014), in which she used a mosaic of 3,564 paintings to bring to life microstories of everyday life.“This film was realized to gether with the residents of a retirement home through a series of workshops. It fo cuses on the notion of time through the use of family photographs.”

Time, why think about it?

Charlotte Dunker
Belgium / 2015 / 9 min.
section: Fascinations
World Premiere
Latency, Contemplation 1
A digitally distorted seascape brings out the horizon, which together with the rolling waves creates a visually hypnotic abstract composition of horizontal surfaces, moving in time to minimalist piano music and electronically manipulated ocean sounds, in a seemingly continuous observation of the shore. “Each line with its own intrinsic ‘intuition’ metamorphoses my perception, exploring how all these personal, inner experiences, both illusionary and tactile, shift and transform into a visual poem.”

Latency, Contemplation 1

Seoungho Cho
United States, South Korea / 2016 / 6 min.
section: Fascinations
Czech Premiere
Mayhem
Minor irregularities are transformed into an elemental disorder of growing, jumping, decaying and reappearing bubbles, only to become focused into a circle of changing colors. Using digital tools, the author depicts the simple process by which water boils and cools again. Japanese experimental filmmaker, producer, and computer artist Yoshiki Nishimura has shown several of his films at previous editions of the Jihlava IDFF. In Fascinating Moments (2014) he followed the choreography of snowflakes, An Observation (2013) is a composition of upside images of the sea, and Orbiting (2015) explored the changing light of the moon as it shines through a visually manipulated digital image.“By using different media, we have great possibilities of expanding our views of reality into various directions.”

Mayhem

Yoshiki Nishimura
Japan / 2016 / 10 min.
section: Fascinations
World Premiere
On the Border
The filmmaker takes hundreds of photographs of ocean trash that has washed up on the shores of Japan and uses the photogrammetry technique to turn them into sculptures. When filmed in the virtual space, they become mementos of environmental irresponsibility and examples of the excesses of our affluent way of everyday life. "Looking through the eyes of new technologies, we can have unexpected and incredible views of the reality." Y. Nishimura  

On the Border

Yoshiki Nishimura
Japan / 2018 / 7 min.
section: Fascinations
World Premiere
The Philosophy of Horror (Part I): Etymology
The first part of a seven-part adaptation of the influential 1990 book of the same name by American philosopher and art theorist Noël Carroll. In the spirit of cinematic philosophy (filmosophy), Lichter explores various aspects of the horror genre – in this part, primarily the position of the characters, the human bodies, and the types of gazes to which they are subjects – by directly manipulating the body of the film. “The Philosophy of Horror: A Symphony of Film Theory is an immersive meditation on genre theory, which aims to demonstrate the eternal beauty of Art Philosophy and Pop Culture’s interconnectedness.” B. Máté, P. Lichter    
personal program

The Philosophy of Horror (Part I): Etymology

Bori Máté, Péter Lichter
Hungary / 2019 / 7 min.
section: Fascinations
International Premiere
CAMERA (Notes on Film 10)
A meditation on surveillance, dramatized by a person having panic and anxiety attacks in a white room with no doors or windows. The filmmaker reflects on the omnipresence of seemingly inconspicuous observation. The impossibility of a hidden camera’s objectivity is emphasized by reactive changes in its angle of view when the person attacks it. Austrian filmmaker and curator Norbert Pfaffenbichler (1967) is a pioneer of video art and a founding member of the VIDOK art group. His works often combine electronic music and abstract projections. Pfaffenbichler was the curator of the important group exhibition Abstraction Now at the Künstlerhaus in Vienna (2003), which worked with computergenerated sounds. Previously at Jihlava IDFF, he showed his film Intermezzo (Notes on Film 4) (2012).„Camera is a short étude on the topic of the invisible camera. it is part of my ‘notes on film-series ’ which deals with different topics from the history and theory of film.”

CAMERA (Notes on Film 10)

Norbert Pfaffenbichler
Austria / 2015 / 13 min.
section: Fascinations
Czech Premiere
Blending and Blinding
Strictly working with the film material inside the camera, Tuohy updates slowly forgotten approaches to create a collage of architectural geometries. The monolithic nature of the image blurs the outlines of the buildings as the film frame disintegrates into grids cutting through the layers of the image in multiple exposures. The buildings depicted represent the cultures of the three main ethnic groups of Malaysia. "This film is dedicated to Paul Clipson and Robert Todd, both of whose works were specifically on my mind while filming this film in Malaysia in 2016." R. Tuohy  

Blending and Blinding

Richard Tuohy
Australia / 2018 / 11 min.
section: Fascinations
European Premiere
Untitled, 1925, Part Three
“When I close my eyes, everything remains the same”, says the filmmaker at the start of her work, which records places in the Andes as she retraces the journey her Romanian-Jewish grandfather undertook in 1925 in order to acquire Peruvian citizenship, which allowed him to save his family from Europe twelve years later. “An atmospheric and meditative film. A journey that revives and confronts memory and reality. The film was shot on a 16mm high contrast film stock which has sadly been discontinued.” M. Piller

Untitled, 1925, Part Three

Madi Piller
Canada / 2017 / 11 min.
section: Fascinations
East European Premiere
Phantasma
In rhythmically changing parallel scenes, this visual atlas of the underwater world shows animals and their natural movements, waving plants and growing crystals, but also the rooms, machinery and equipment at the Copenhagen aquarium that has exhibited these living being for more than 70 years. “While filming I was pulled into a melancholic and haunted realm. The collapsing aquarium became an allegory of a shared past and time itself. It represents an enchanted place where both the struggle to remember and to forget intertwine.”

Phantasma

Saara Ekström
Finland / 2016 / 9 min.
section: Fascinations
World Premiere
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