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25th Ji.hlava International Documentary Film Festival

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Personal Life of a Hole
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Personal Life of a Hole
Personal Life of a Hole
Personal Life of a Hole
Personal Life of a Hole

Personal Life of a Hole

director: Ondřej Vavrečka
original title: Osobní život díry
country: Czech Republic, Finland
year: 2020
running time: 62 min.

synopsis

In the introduction to his atypical philosophical essay, Ondřej Vavrečka asks, “What is the world?” Is it at all possible to discover, understand and describe something that is so random and disconnected, so unanchored in space and time, as is the world of today? Is it not needless to look for sense or meaning where there is none? Therefore, rather than looking for fixed points, the filmmaker focused on holes and gaps, on inconsistency and imperfection – in nature, in culture, in love and in work. Together with scientists and philosophers, from Althusser to Žižek, he uses a lively, stylistically and thematically eclectic collage to explore how emptiness can be pondered.

Q&A with Ondřej Vavrečka, Alžběta Janáčková a Andrea Slováková:

 

biography

Filmmaker, musician and artist Ondřej Vavrečka (b. 1980) attended a secondary school focused on programming, followed by studies at the Charles University Faculty of Humanities and FAMU. In his cryptic and open-ended films, such as Ultimum Refugium (2011, Ji.hlava IDFF 2011), The Interposed (2014, Ji.hlava IDFF 2014) and De Potentia Dei (2016, Ji.hlava IDFF), he explores the issues faced by the present-day world as well as the limits of what we can say about it with the help of available symbols and attributes.

more about film

director: Ondřej Vavrečka
producer: Alžběta Janáčková
photography: Simon Todorov
editing: Anna Petruželová

other films in the section

The Great Night
In the twilight of consumer democracy, priestesses of love come to life and wait for their customers. Prostitutes, sales clerks, warehouse workers, non-stop bars, dance clubs, musty flats. A subculture of insomnia that lives the eternal night. Unceasing dissatisfaction with one’s life and unfulfilled desires. The rhythm of the nocturnal life of consumption and rapid gain, soaked in amphetamine and cheep alcohol.Assembly-line production of gaming machines, tools for the consumption of human disorder and unhappiness. The lottery of prostitutes and nighttime wandering that defies angelic choirs of purity and modesty. Sonatas next to cheap hot dogs, shampoo, and the hopelessness of housing projects.

The Great Night

Petr Hátle
Czech Republic / 2013 / 72 min.
section: Czech Joy
World Premiere
The Gospel According to Brabenec
Journalist Renata Kalenská’s book of interviews with member of the Plastic People Vratislav Brabenec recorded not only his memories of the underground years, but also the author’s experiences with this highly distinctive individual. This cinematic sequel builds on those experiences as it captures her additional interviews with Brabenec – improvised talks at places that hold some meaning for Brabenec or Kalenská. The result is several scenes of irrelevant philosophising, self-deprecating humor, and commentary on the life of birds and on nature in general. The conversations, recorded mostly by hand-held camera, are interspersed with poetic citations.DETAIL:“Do you ever feel happy?” “I don’t like the word happy at all. I equate happy with stupid.” “I’m unhappy with you. So I guess I’m un-stupid.”

The Gospel According to Brabenec

Miroslav Janek
Czech Republic / 2014 / 90 min.
section: Czech Joy
World Premiere
Family
A video diary exploring the most intimate and most universal. The film looks not only at the political climate within one’s own family, but also explores the boundaries between the public and the private in the age of the internet. This vivid proof of the lack of comprehension between the right and the left does not provide a political analysis, but rather offers one generation’s view of a confused era. “Those stupid kids go on hunger strike against the communists, and their dissident friends think the vice premier is a punk and call him ‘duke’…” The words of Ivan Hoffman, who doesn’t play the guitar much anymore, since there is nothing to play and no one to play to.

Family

Apolena Rychlíková
Czech Republic / 2013 / 64 min.
section: Czech Joy
World Premiere
We Can Do Better
As the personal advisor to presidential candidate Michal Horáček, documentary filmmaker Robin Kvapil recorded from behind the scenes of the campaign from autumn 2016. He filmed using anything he could get his hands on - camera, mobile phone, notebook computer. The film, co-directed by Radim Procházka, was an attempt to capture an authentic portrait of Horáček’s election campaign, presenting his team’s tactics, interactions with both supporters and opponents, with journalists, and with opposing candidates. With an awareness that they had most likely lost the election, but that there was still a long path ahead of them, Kvapil presented a reflection of their teamwork, commenting on their individual steps.„Documentarist as a presidential campaign adviser. ‚Nothing‘ and ‚I don‘t know‘ can not win over lies and hatred. The truth scares.“ R. Kvapil „Hustler, Trasher, Zjeman and Troll in the film about the backstage of democracy.“ R. Procházka

We Can Do Better

Radim Procházka, Robin Kvapil
Czech Republic / 2018 / 74 min.
section: Czech Joy
World Premiere
Family Business /  from Videodiary
Director Jakub Wagner attempts to create a family inventory rather than a family portrait. With his pursuit of objectivity masked by suppressed indignation, the director’s father describes the miserable state of his neglected home, where the director’s artistically inclined family lived for many generations. The recording of the tour is intertwined with archival footage, from home video to a Czech TV documentary to clips from the director’s twelve-year-old thesis work dedicated to his grandfather. Audio-visual recordings  – just like the objects strewn around the family home  – act as uncertain artefacts, which still need to be engraved with the hallmark of a personal history.DETAIL:“Here you’ll find the marble sculpture of my mother, a sculpture by Ladislav Čerych, it’s on the floor behind the door. The library is covered in sculptures by Jan Wágner, which are entirely inappropriate for an Art Nouveau interior.”

Family Business / from Videodiary

Jakub Wagner
Czech Republic / 2014 / 62 min.
section: Czech Joy
World Premiere
The Invisible Hand of the Market: Privatization of Barrandov
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The Invisible Hand of the Market: Privatization of Barrandov

Martin Kohout
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section: Czech Joy
World Premiere
Blind Gulliver
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Blind Gulliver

Martin Ryšavý
Czech Republic / 2016 / 105 min.
section: Czech Joy
World Premiere
Buttons of Consciousness
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Buttons of Consciousness

Jan Šípek
Czech Republic / 2015 / 87 min.
section: Czech Joy
World Premiere
Life and Death in Tanvald - director’s cut
The town of Tanvald as a symbol for identifying current society-wide attitudes. The death of a young Roma spurs the filmmakers’ investigation into the incident’s true course of events. The mysteries of the country’s creeping xenophobia provide a key to understanding anti-Roma attitudes. Over the course of a year, we witness the transforming landscape of Czech nationalism and the social tectonics of the racial conflict of a twisted society. The self-analytical look at the schism between the two filmmakers provides a welcome debate on the ethical integrity of the documentary filmmaker. The filmmaker’s approach comes close to desecrating the sanctity of childhood innocence.

Life and Death in Tanvald - director’s cut

Filip Remunda, Vít Klusák
Czech Republic / 2013 / 57 min.
section: Czech Joy
World Premiere
Normal Autistic Film
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Normal Autistic Film

Miroslav Janek
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section: Czech Joy
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Faces of Meda

Veronika Janečková
Czech Republic / 2015 / 50 min.
section: Czech Joy
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Mat goc

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section: Czech Joy
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