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24th Ji.hlava International Documentary Film Festival

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Displacement
Displacement
Displacement
Displacement

Displacement

director: Guli Silberstein
original title: Displacement
country: United Kingdom
year: 2019
running time: 5 min.

synopsis

The image’s fragile cohesiveness, disturbed by digital disintegration and overlays to create a visually impressive composition, emphasizes the need to think about remediated messages on the subject of nationalism and militarism, for the filmmaker works with images of Palestinian fields being burnt by Jewish settlers and vows taken by Israeli soldiers at the Wailing Wall in Jerusalem.

“My work tracks patterns in nature, landscape and human form, perceived by camera and mind, struggling to comprehend the vast intensity of the living experience of the world through electronic media.“ G. Silberstein     

biography

Israeli artist Guli Silberstein (1969) lives and works in London. In his digital videos, he works with personal recordings and footage found in the media, which he “violates” using tools that distort the image. The result often feels out of focus and unsettling – a sense further underscored by the soundtrack. The Ji.hlava festival has shown numerous of his films since 2008.

more about film

director: Guli Silberstein
producer: Guli Silberstein

other films in the section

Save (My heart from the world)
The movements of the ferry, creating additional disturbances in the waves of the Mediterranean Sea, enable the creation of colorful compositions, unexpectedly degraded algorithmic interventions of digital compression which in inventive surfaces and grids mask and repeatedly renew the authenticity of the record of the voyage, while the horizon becomes an escaping uncertainty. Jacques Perconte (1974) is a leading figure on the French avant garde film scene. He experiments with digital images, codecs, and compression algorithms that he himself creates. Thematically he focuses primarily on the relationships of contemporary culture and technologically advanced civilizations with nature. His work has been screened at past Jihlava IDFFs: L (2014), Les Moutiers (2012), and Ettrick (2015), among others.“The wind blew from the starting of the ferry. Offshore, the swell could make the travel difficult, but that boat would split the sea and project its Mediterranean blue in the golden sky and the fire light of the setting sun in the waves.”

Save (My heart from the world)

Jacques Perconte
France / 2016 / 10 min.
section: Fascinations
East European Premiere
Rear Window Timelapse
An ingenious analysis of Alfred Hitchcock’s thriller, in which sequentiality is replaced by parallelism, but the events in the observed apartment mostly retain their original order. The layering of narrative lines creates surprising meanings as the film break free from the rules of the genre. The introductory sequence clearly splits up the space of the courtyard and the opposite windows into various planes while drawing attention to the role of the observer – the architect of the story. As opposed to the original movie, however, we never see him.

Rear Window Timelapse

Jeff Desom
Luxembourg / 2012 / 3 min.
section: Fascinations
East European Premiere
Impact-9.2
The filmmaker arranges 59,049 personal photographs (out of the long-term project) from 2002 and 2003, all of them created in the post-9/11 atmosphere, into repetitive geometric compositions to form a changeable structure of infinite possibilities for interpreting memories. Set to a musical composition inspired by Thomas Hardy’s poem “The Comet at Yalbury”. German-born filmmaker Thomas Mohr (1954) lives in the Netherlands. In his work, he seeks out new ways of generating images. Originally, he was drawn to abstraction; today it is digital photography. The Jihlava IDFF previously showed his film Gedankenstrich(e) (2014), in which he arranged images into regular grids to evoke a journey and pilgrimage across a landscape of text.“What d o we remember, what d o we forget and what d o we really learn? Based on 531,441 pictures taken in 30 years I’m exploring how our memories transform into experience.”

Impact-9.2

Thomas Mohr
Netherlands / 2016 / 10 min.
section: Fascinations
World Premiere
ONE-1-2
An algorithmic composition of 531,441 photographs taken over the course of three decades since 1985 place personal and societal events into various contexts to create a minimalist study of informational value, comprehensibility and memory of events. “After all: what is the nature of these moments/events : 9/11, Hiroshima, Buchenwald, political/economic conditions, art, family, coffee, tea, being here/there. After 531,441 pictures 1985–2015 a sum.” T. Mohr T. Mohr

ONE-1-2

Thomas Mohr
Netherlands / 2017 / 16 min.
section: Fascinations
World Premiere
The Philosophy of Horror (Part I): Etymology
The first part of a seven-part adaptation of the influential 1990 book of the same name by American philosopher and art theorist Noël Carroll. In the spirit of cinematic philosophy (filmosophy), Lichter explores various aspects of the horror genre – in this part, primarily the position of the characters, the human bodies, and the types of gazes to which they are subjects – by directly manipulating the body of the film. “The Philosophy of Horror: A Symphony of Film Theory is an immersive meditation on genre theory, which aims to demonstrate the eternal beauty of Art Philosophy and Pop Culture’s interconnectedness.” B. Máté, P. Lichter    
personal program

The Philosophy of Horror (Part I): Etymology

Bori Máté, Péter Lichter
Hungary / 2019 / 7 min.
section: Fascinations
International Premiere
La Notte Salva
Tiny animals of different kinds were filmed by night and then magnified under semi-transparent spherical glasses. The activity of constantly moving organisms subjected to magnification results in unexpected images of unrest, changeability, migration and creativity in altering shapes. „La notte salva is a path of sensations that attempts to gather around its nature without revealing it, without opening itself to any human language.“ G. Boccassini
personal program

La Notte Salva

Giuseppe Boccassini
Germany, Italy / 2019 / 12 min.
section: Fascinations
World Premiere
Man in Motion, 2012
Inspired by the analysis of movement in the studies of Eadweard Muybridge and Etienne-Jules Marey, the filmmakers depict the movement of a person going upstairs – except that they use a mirror effect to give the images a new sense of time existing outside of reality, and they replace an analysis of motion with a construction of infinite reproduction.The original chronophotography enabled the depiction of the individual stages of motion through a series of photographs. In the 1870s, such photographs were taken using a flash exposure of a thousandth of a second.

Man in Motion, 2012

Christophe M. Saber, Ruben Glauser, Max Idje
Switzerland / 2013 / 3 min.
section: Fascinations
European Premiere
Firefly
A performative film that compiles close-up shots of concentrated faces with abstract images converging towards a distinct point of light and geometric shots of dancing figures to create an associative image of fireflies, which in Cuban mythology represent ghosts, echoes of fires, or souls passing in the night. “Through collaborative processes and experimentation, I make films that allow a sensory experience, expanding the spectator’s perception of the social/political/cultural/personal phenomenon portrayed.” C. Claremi 
personal program

Firefly

Claudia Claremi
Cuba / 2019 / 17 min.
section: Fascinations
World Premiere
The Trembling Giant
A view of the landscape of the American Southwest, where the largest organism on Earth grows – a 60,000-year-old colony of quaking aspens – was filmed with a digital camera through the take-up reel of a 16mm projector in order to emphasize the characteristic effect of projected film material which rhythmically warps the space in front of the projector. Patrick Tarrant (1969) is originally from Melbourne, Australia and teaches at London South Bank University. He is the author of meditative films, that draw on the atmosphere of cities and urban peripheries.“My repurposing of a 16mm film projector warps space in three dimensions in order that we might reflect on our journey from a people who feared the natural world to people who must now fear for the natural world.”

The Trembling Giant

Patrick Tarrant
United Kingdom / 2016 / 19 min.
section: Fascinations
East European Premiere
SOU
The texture of minerals meticulously stacked one on top of the other emphasizes solidity but also the changes wrought by time. Some of the patterns are absorbed by others; undestructiveness is lost in transparency. The animation of the earth’s non-living surfaces and subsurfaces condenses geological transformation that in real time take millions of year.The gap between stones slowly grows, a rock is transformed as if were an organic body, a fault is quickly covered in another layer, the original colour is absorbed to create new matter.

SOU

Tatsuto Kimura
Japan / 2012 / 10 min.
section: Fascinations
East European Premiere
Hrvoji, Look at You from the Tower
An archeological collage of observations of the traces left by life on the landscape, combined with reflections on ephemerality and historical legacy, set to a music-and-noise composition. Motifs of reincarnation and a possible return, collected while traveling through the former Yugoslavia, culminate with a visit to an abandoned family farm, now accessible only by illegally crossing the border to the European Union. “Through collaborative ways of experiencing how history collides with the present, my work embraces the complexity of a landscape while in the process questioning my own nostalgic and desiring gaze.” R. Ferko
personal program

Hrvoji, Look at You from the Tower

Ryan Ferko
Canada, Serbia, Croatia, Slovenia / 2019 / 17 min.
section: Fascinations
European Premiere
Time, why think about it?
The memories of old people at a senior care facility come to life in fragmentary recollections accompanied by photographs of them and their loved ones and the places and events they remember. The ephemeral nature of these memories is visualised by using painting to alter these images of the passing of time. Belgian artist Charlotte Dunker (1987) uses painting techniques in her films, and also experiments with light-sensitive materials. She works with silence as an opportunity for self-reflection and explores the changeable nature of truth in relation to cultural contexts. The Jihlava IDFF previously showed her film Jupiter Lolopop (2014), in which she used a mosaic of 3,564 paintings to bring to life microstories of everyday life.“This film was realized to gether with the residents of a retirement home through a series of workshops. It fo cuses on the notion of time through the use of family photographs.”

Time, why think about it?

Charlotte Dunker
Belgium / 2015 / 9 min.
section: Fascinations
World Premiere
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