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24th Ji.hlava International Documentary Film Festival

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Why Do I Feel Like A Boy?
Why Do I Feel Like A Boy?
Why Do I Feel Like A Boy?
Why Do I Feel Like A Boy?

Why Do I Feel Like A Boy?

director: Kateřina Turečková
original title: Proč se cítím jako kluk?
country: Czech Republic
year: 2019
running time: 26 min.

synopsis

In a small village in the southern Czech Highlands, the director meets with sixteen-year-old Ben to examine the issue of defining his identity in person: Ben is living in a girl’s body, but feels like a boy. With his real feelings, he flees into the online world and truly feels happy, for example, when using greenscreen technology to participate in Prague Pride. The film indirectly captures the (mis)understanding and (un)acceptance he meets with at school and his focused insight is completed by interviews conducted by the director with his mother and sister, who involuntarily embody everything that Ben hates about himself.

“What I like about it the most is how the story of a teenage transgender boy can disrupt the conservative structures of a television film, go beyond the media, and challenge the inhumane sterilization of transgender people in the Czech Republic.” K. Turečková

 

 

biography

Kateřina Turečková (1993) studied documentary filmmaking at FAMU in Prague. In 2018, she garnered attention for her film Illusions, about the current situation in Hungary, which was also presented at the Ji.hlava festival. Her film poem Tradition (2017) won the Ji.hlava special mention in the category Fascinations Exprmntl.cz.

more about film

director: Kateřina Turečková
producer: Ondřej Šejnoha, Klára Mamojková
script: Kateřina Turečková
photography: Tomáš Šťastný
editing: Lucie Hecht
music: Johny Poupě
sound: Pavel Jan, Juraj Mišejka

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The Last Shift of Thomas Hisem

Jindřich Andrš
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section: Czech Joy
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The State Capture
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The State Capture

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Traces, Fragments, Roots
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Traces, Fragments, Roots

Květa Přibylová
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section: Czech Joy
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Vratislav Effenberger or Black Shark Hunting
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Vratislav Effenberger or Black Shark Hunting

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Will the World Remember Your Name?

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Lost Coast

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Dunaj of Consciousness

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The Dangerous World of Doctor Doleček (Czech version)

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