Tyto webové stránky používají soubory cookies, které nám pomáhají zlepšovat naše služby, personalizovat reklamy a analyzovat návštěvnost. Používáním našich stránek s tímto souhlasíte.
Více informací

24th Ji.hlava International Documentary Film Festival

ji-hlavadok-revuecdfEmerging producersInspiration Forum
Kiruna – A Brand New World
play
Kiruna – A Brand New World
Kiruna – A Brand New World
Kiruna – A Brand New World
Kiruna – A Brand New World
Kiruna – A Brand New World

Kiruna – A Brand New World

director: Greta Stocklassa
original title: Kiruna – překrásný nový svět
country: Czech Republic
year: 2019
running time: 87 min.

synopsis

Apocalyptic depiction of an area literally engulfed by the mining industry is presented in this documentary that observes the eponymous northern Swedish city, part of which was abandoned due to activities in the nearby iron mine. The mining company’s management decided not to halt profitable mining activities and instead made the decision to move the residents of the threatened district. Using footage shot in the city inside the Arctic Circle and directly in the mines, the director has uncovered subtle film imagery, and using the stories of three protagonists now living in a bizarre inter-time, imaginatively addresses the topics of resettlement, tradition, and respect for a particular location.

“The dystopian story of Kiruna is about lost people looking for a home in an uprooted city. It shows the dark side of the advanced society, whether in Sweden or the Czech Republic.” G. Stocklassa

biography

Czech-Swedish director Greta Stocklassa (1993) studies documentary filmmaking at FAMU. She garnered attention with her short student films, studies of an artificial aortic valve Metal on Metal (2017) and a parade of postcards for International Women’s Day Views of Věra Bechyňová (2015), which was screened at the Visions du Reel festival along with her feature debut Kiruna.

more about film

director: Greta Stocklassa
producer: Veronika Kührová, Michal Kráčmer, Ondřej Šejnoha, Alena Müllerová, Tomáš Srovnal, Ludvík Bohadlo, Markéta Pášmová, Čestmír Vančura
script: Greta Stocklassa
photography: Stanislav Adam
editing: Hana Dvořáčková
sound: Pavel Jan

other films in the section

In Your Eyes
This Italian documentary on the daily lives of five visually impaired people is also an experiment based on an analogy between the movie camera and the human eye. The filmmakers have tried to use film technology to show audiences how people suffering from visual impairments see their surroundings. All of the film’s footage is strongly out of focus in order to show how visually impaired individuals see objects around them.DETAIL:“I see it as something restricted to a problem with my eyes. I am partially sighted and I could turn blind by just bringing a child into the world. I could turn blind by simply breastfeeding.”

In Your Eyes

Pietro Albino Di Pasquale
Italy / 2014 / 78 min.
section: Opus Bonum
World Premiere
Non-Parent
With her documentary study of the current form of the family, the director follows up on her earlier film Generation Singles. By looking at six different stories, she presents various views and opinions regarding partnership and parenthood – what does shared custody look like, how does a single parent raise children and how do lesbians? How do patchwork families function, how is it with adopted kids and how is it with people who have decided to never have any at all? In intimate on-camera interviews, the participants explain their decisions, however voluntary, and reflect on the causes and consequences of their (non-)functioning families or partnerships. “Changes in the concept of family are a sign of the times. Today there are many different forms of cohabitation. I am not judging whether the fact that the family is changing is good or bad. I am merely recording this trend because it affects us all.” J. Počtová

Non-Parent

Jana Počtová
Czech Republic / 2017 / 83 min.
section: Czech Joy
World Premiere
Covered with the Blood of Jesus
For Richard, life is an unending cyclical journey to scratch out a living. Fetch water, take diesel from the pipeline, try to sell it by the side of the road, go to school, study in the dorm, fetch water again. If he wants to reach his goal – to get his education and use it to break out of the vicious circle of his life – he can’t stop. In a lively observation, the film director brings us closer to the life of poor Africans in the Niger River Delta. Close to natural heritage of enormous value, a huge agglomeration of residents suffers, to whom massive oil extraction that brutally destroys the environment brings only meagre extra income.DETAIL:“We are taking our oil, we are not stealing, it’s in our village. Europeans are enriching themselves with our resources and leaving us in extreme poverty. The entire world is benefiting from Nigeria but we don’t have access to it...”

Covered with the Blood of Jesus

Tommaso Cotronei
Nigeria, Italy / 2015 / 72 min.
section: Opus Bonum
World Premiere
14 Homicides
The state of Utah has very broad definitions of when a police officer can use a weapon on duty. Last year, 14 controversial deaths were caused by the police. This documentary, based on traditional film structure, is made up of 14 two-minute static shots of the crime scenes. The soundtrack consists of recited texts made up of interrogation reports and the responses of people close to the victims. The objective communication sharply contrasts with the tragic incidents. The fixed camera view becomes a sad reminder of a fatal incident which paradoxically most authorities consider to be justified.DETAIL:An attorney for the Hunt family says they don't believe Darian attacked officers with the toy sword. He also stated that he was a harmless and innocent young man who was drawn into an incident provoked by the police.

14 Homicides

Jona Gerlach
United States / 2015 / 34 min.
section: Opus Bonum
World Premiere
Helena's Law
Documentary filmmaker Petra Nesvačilová’s study of the famous “Berdych Gang” focuses on police officer Helena Kahnová, but she also interviews other actors in the case, including the accused and the convicted. The resulting film is a mosaic that says less about the case or its background than it does about the people who exist on the edge of the law, and about their thoughts and motivations. Nesvačilová herself comes into contact with the criminal underworld and becomes an actor in her own film. She must decide whether it is safe to meet certain people, which leads her to consider questions related to the essence of crime and of good and evil in general.“I thought I was shooting a portrait of a brave police woman, but in the end I found myself in places that I had always been afraid of and that I only knew from the movies. The underworld. And now I see that this underworld is all around us – sometimes very, very close.”

Helena's Law

Petra Nesvačilová
Czech Republic / 2016 / 80 min.
section: Czech Joy
World Premiere
The End of Time
From Swiss scientists who seek to probe regions of time we cannot see in a 27-kilometre long tunnel, to lava flows in Hawaii which have overwhelmed all but one home on the south side of Big Island, to a Hindu funeral rite near the place of Buddha’s enlightenment, Mettler explores our perception of time, the nature of time. “What is time? When no one asks me, then I know. Was I to explain it to someone, only then I don’t.” (St. Augustine)

The End of Time

Peter Mettler
Canada, Switzerland / 2012 / 109 min.
section: Opus Bonum
Carousel
A chrono-photographic visit to the museum in the age of its digital reproducibility. This is the director’s characterization of Carousel, a film that skirts the boundary between documentary and visual art. Using un-commented images, the film correlates the museum space, its visitors, and digital recording technology. Using changing film speeds, visitors become ghosts, their movement becoming the most fundamental element, dictated more by a need to document everything with the camera than a desire to actually view the exhibited objects. The film’s conclusion shows that the most remarkable exhibits at museums today are their visitors."You don't have to see. You don't have to feel. You don't have to share. You just have to follow the guide, turn around and admire." A.Gerber

Carousel

Arnaud Gerber
France, Germany / 2018 / 35 min.
section: Opus Bonum
World Premiere
Passion - Between Revolt and Resignation
Deeply personal and openly political, this documentary chronicles the life of activist Christian Labhart who was framed by Bach's oratorio of Matthew's Passion. The film presents a bitter testimony of the futile waiting for major social change, as well as the personified history of anti-establishment activism. A monologue recapitulating the director's life since 1968 across major historical events such as the fall of the Berlin Wall and the 9/11 attacks has been interwoven with quotes from left-wing thinkers from Bertolt Brecht to Slavoj Žižek. Newly shot footage illustrates how their warning theses are gradually being fulfilled in a contemporary public space.Fifty years ago I began to fight for a better world. Now I switch between revolt and resignation. With these feelings I began a cinematic trip through the jungle of today’s capitalism. Ch. Labhart
personal program

Passion - Between Revolt and Resignation

Christian Labhart
Switzerland / 2019 / 80 min.
section: Opus Bonum
International Premiere
Letters to Max
Maxim Gvinjia, the former minister of foreign affairs of the breakaway republic of Abkhazia – whose independence from Georgia has been recognized by only a few countries – is a friend of director Eric Baudelaire, who has been writing him from France since 2012. In the film, these letters are presented in text form and Gvinjia’s telephone replies are read in voiceovers. Gvinjia’s personal stories and his reflections upon his nation and its history are accompanied by footage of daily life in Abkhazia, for the most part short and simple snapshots taken by a professional hand-held camera, with no apparent connection to the letters’ contents.DETAIL:“The first letter that I received. It’s real letter, it’s wrapped in paper. ‘Dear Max, Are you there? Eric.’ Honestly, I am somewhere. I’m here, I’m in Abkhazia, in my office. It’s a sunny day. It’s eve of independence day.”

Letters to Max

Eric Baudelaire
France / 2014 / 103 min.
section: Opus Bonum
East European Premiere
Spring yes yes yes
Originally a sound woman by trade, Audrey Ginestet has created an intimate reportage and purely personal experiment: She decided to spend a winter in Japan with a past lover, a man with whom she had a relationship ten years before in France and whom she has not seen since. The cramped little house becomes a stage for monologues on intercultural differences and the possibility of relationships across cultures and between individual beings, combined with the observation of details inside the house and in nature.

Spring yes yes yes

Audrey Ginestet
France, Japan / 2012 / 38 min.
section: Opus Bonum
Central European Premiere
King Does Nothing
“I don’t do anything on Sundays”, improvises Petr Král on the winners’ platform of a deserted velodrome. A fluid portrait of a poet in motion between dreaming and presence, between Paris and Prague, between a velodrome and eternity. This situational documentary offers a sketch of an active and inspirational person who continues to base his art on wonder as the core of a philosophical debate with the world, man, and dreams. Doing nothing: the ability to stop, wonder, and enjoy; elitism as the ability to talk with people and inspire them.

King Does Nothing

Jan Gogola ml.
Czech Republic / 2012 / 52 min.
section: Czech Joy
World Premiere
Kuichisan
This portrait of Okinawa, a Japanese island formerly home to an American military base, is conceived as a young boy’s daydream-like wanderings, his attention randomly falling on various objects and events. The film thus represents a bold victory of cinematic intuition over method and order. The combination of 16mm black-and-white camera with color images, a soundtrack disconnected from the images, and the blurring of the boundaries between documentary and fiction make this film an enigmatic but fascinating experience.

Kuichisan

Maiko Endo
Japan, United States / 2012 / 76 min.
section: Opus Bonum
Czech Premiere
Ministerstvo kultury
Fond kinematografie
Evropská unie
Město Jihlava
Kraj Vysočina
Česká televize
Český rozhlas
Aktuálně.cz
Respekt