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24th Ji.hlava International Documentary Film Festival

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The Sound is Innocent
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The Sound is Innocent
The Sound is Innocent
The Sound is Innocent
The Sound is Innocent

The Sound is Innocent

director: Johana Ožvold
original title: The Sound is Innocent
country: Czech Republic, France, Slovakia
year: 2019
running time: 68 min.

synopsis

In this documentary essay, the director personally presents the history of electronic and experimental music from the pre-war years to the present day. The film takes place in an almost dream-like space-time that serves both as a recording studio and as a museum of technological artifacts, which allow the filmmaker to take playful grasp of the concept of talking heads. The sonically and visually layered excursion to the beginnings of the efforts to liberate and conceptualize sound is also a debate about the forms, possibilities, and perspectives of the acoustic relations to the world, in which the voices of the past constantly overlap with the sounds of the future.

„Music documentaries usually tend to build a monument to a composer, band or subculture… My aim was to treat this topic in an essay-like style, using all available means that film as an audiovisual medium offers.” J. Ožvold

biography

Actress, musician, writer, singer, curator and filmmaker Johana Ožvold (1983) made her first short films at FAMU, where she began studying in 2009. For Hi, I'm Doing Fine (2013), she won a prize at the Festival of Film Schools in Poitiers, France, and her diploma film Black Cake (2016) won the 33rd FAMUfest.

more about film

director: Johana Ožvold
producer: Kristýna Michálek Květová, Ivan Ostrochovský, Jean-Laurent Csinidis, Katarina Tomkova
script: Johana Ožvold, Lukáš Csicsely
photography: Šimon Dvořáček
editing: Zuzana Walter
music: Martin Ožvold
sound: Adam Voneš, Martin Ožvold

other films in the section

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Vratislav Effenberger or Black Shark Hunting

David Jařab
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section: Czech Joy
World Premiere
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Central Bus Station

Tomáš Elšík
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section: Czech Joy
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Instructions for Use of Jiří Kolář
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Instructions for Use of Jiří Kolář

Roman Štětina, Miroslav Buriánek
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personal program

Why Do I Feel Like A Boy?

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personal program

Jaroslav Kučera A Journal

Jakub Felcman
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Traces, Fragments, Roots

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Milda

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Vote For Kibera

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