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24th Ji.hlava International Documentary Film Festival

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Helena's Law
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Helena's Law
Helena's Law
Helena's Law

Helena's Law

director: Petra Nesvačilová
original title: Zákon Helena
country: Czech Republic
year: 2016
running time: 80 min.

synopsis

Documentary filmmaker Petra Nesvačilová’s study of the famous “Berdych Gang” focuses on police officer Helena Kahnová, but she also interviews other actors in the case, including the accused and the convicted. The resulting film is a mosaic that says less about the case or its background than it does about the people who exist on the edge of the law, and about their thoughts and motivations. Nesvačilová herself comes into contact with the criminal underworld and becomes an actor in her own film. She must decide whether it is safe to meet certain people, which leads her to consider questions related to the essence of crime and of good and evil in general.

“I thought I was shooting a portrait of a brave police woman, but in the end I found myself in places that I had always been afraid of and that I only knew from the movies. The underworld. And now I see that this underworld is all around us – sometimes very, very close.”

biography

Petra Nesvačilová (1985) first gained attention as an actress in Karin Babinská’s Dolls (2007). In addition to regularly appearing in Czech films and television series, she is currently studying documentary film at FAMU. Past films shown at the Jihlava IDFF include Opus No. 50 on the Story of Milada Horáková (2009), Tell Me Where the Germans Are (2011), and an episode of the series Ex-Premiers about Václav Klaus, From Borotín up to the top of Sněžka Mountain (2013).

more about film

director: Petra Nesvačilová
producer: Klára Žaloudková
script: Petra Nesvačilová
photography: Klára Belicová
editing: Josef Krajbich
music: Jan P. Muchow
sound: Ladislav Greiner

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Instructions for Use of Jiří Kolář

Roman Štětina, Miroslav Buriánek
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section: Czech Joy, First Lights
World Premiere
Notorious Deeds
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Notorious Deeds

Gabriel Tempea
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Metaphysics and Democracy

Luis Ortiz
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section: First Lights
World Premiere
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Savagery

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Boy of War

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One Last Time in the Fields

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section: Czech Joy
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27 Times Time

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My Name is Hungry Buffalo

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section: Czech Joy, First Lights
World Premiere
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Heidegger in Auschwitz

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personal program

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