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24th Ji.hlava International Documentary Film Festival

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The Room You Take
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The Room You Take

The Room You Take

director: Pedro Filipe Marques
original title: O lugar que ocupas
country: Portugal
year: 2016
running time: 165 min.

synopsis

The world is a theatre. And in every theatre, there are usually backstage spaces that remain hidden from the run-of-the-mill spectator. In this stylized observational documentary, director Marques provides us with a glimpse behind the scenes of smaller Portuguese theatre groups. At a time when metallic monsters in the form of giant demolition bulldozers are razing a traditional theatre building, the marginal position of most theatre outsiders becomes even more depressing. Excerpts of conversations held in front of dressing room mirrors, poetic commentaries, and natural motifs are brought together to create an allegory filled with reflections, both those in the mirror, as well as their equivalents from the theatre that is the world.

“I wonder if the proletarian artist isn't already an endangered species. From observational to essayistic, I build this atlas-like film to capture the mirrors of those who take this adventurous survival.”

biography

Pedro Filipe Marques (1976) is a well-known editor of fiction films and documentaries. His first feature-length documentary film The Way We Are (2011) received awards at several festivals (including DocumentaMadrid and Cinema du Réel to name but two). In his next film, The Room You Take (2016), he returns to his characteristic motifs of reflections, mirror images, and observations about the economic and social crisis that Portuguese society is currently facing.

more about film

director: Pedro Filipe Marques
cast: Lígia Roque, Maria Duarte, Gonçalo Ferreira d'Almeida, Miguel Loureiro, Cristina Carvalhal, Álvaro Correia, Crista Alfaiate, Dina Félix da Costa, Catarina Lacerda, Carlos Paulo, Sara Graça, José Jorge Duarte, Carla Galvão, Sofia Dinger, Daniel Martinho, Matamba Joaquim, Zia Soares, Ana Rosa Mendes, Sara Carinhas
producer: Rita Palma, Marta Pessoa
script: Pedro Filipe Marques, Rita Palma
photography: Marta Pessoa, Pedro Filipe Marques
editing: Rita Palma, Pedro Filipe Marques
sound: Elsa Ferreira

other films in the section

Buenos Aires Free Party
Banal scenes from the preparations for and during the course of a freetechno party regularly alternate with a frenetic sequences of events from Argentine history to produce a hypnotic and frightening trip. On the one hand is the aesthetic of the music video and its ability to capture the state of entropy across time by using audiovisual repetition and playing with pacing, color and brightness. On the other hand is an effect-free record of real life, specifically the freetechno subculture, whose non-aggressive nature contrasts with the destruction and chaos that rule the surrounding world.  DETAIL: The monotonous rhythm of flying over Buenos Aires is broken by a flash of fear: one frame of an attacking monster.

Buenos Aires Free Party

Homero Cirelli
Argentina / 2014 / 74 min.
section: Opus Bonum
International Premiere
A Long Farewell
After years of negotiations, a complex of apartment buildings on the edge of Seoul is heading inexorably for destruction. With the demolition impending, the residents of the buildings slated for destruction try to express what this place means to them. Raya Kim’s minimalist documentary is not built on an apocalyptic mood or kitschy sentiment, but is rather precisely presented in the contrasts between image and sound. Static shots of homes and the surrounding landscape present a portrait of a quiet, seemingly undisturbed everyday life, while detached voices of observers recount their often-dramatic personal experiences, not hiding the uncertainty of what comes next. „What do the actual residents think about the houses scheduled for reconstruction? As with all homes, there are many different forms of time and love.” R. Kim

A Long Farewell

Raya Kim
South Korea / 2017 / 72 min.
section: Opus Bonum
International Premiere
Touch
A highly subjective film essay that highlights the constructed nature of any work of art and of perception in general. After many years, a man returns home to New York’s Chinatown, where he recounts the story of his life and that of his dying mother in two languages. A film full of radical transitions between silence and words.“Chinatown is divided into two overlapping tribes: the watchers and the watched.” “I wanted to be photographer. I became a librarian cataloguing other people‘s lives, while secretly inventing my own.”

Touch

Shelly Silver
United States / 2013 / 68 min.
section: Opus Bonum
East European Premiere
Rock on Bones
An encounter between a French director and the Russian punk band The Oz launched a more than two-year journey between Paris and St. Petersburg. Captivated by the band’s charismatic singer Igor Salnikov, Caroline Troubetzkoy decides to help The Oz break through in the West. In return, she gets an exclusive opportunity to learn about the history of Russian rock’n’roll and its politically charged contexts, and gains access to rare footage for a highly personal film that exceeds the definition of documentary and tends towards performance.DETAIL:“Western vinyls arrived in the country as contraband, but nobody could afford the price. So some clever guys had the bright idea of inventing an illegal machine that could copy these vinyls on pieces of medical X-rays.”

Rock on Bones

Caroline Troubetzkoy
France / 2014 / 154 min.
section: Opus Bonum
World Premiere
The New Day
A mixture of documentary and fiction as seen through the eyes of a non-participant observer, this drama presents the life of the fisherman Maldonado. After his wife Celia leaves him, we watch his lonely life in a series of cyclical everyday activities as we listen to Celia’s voiceover. Although it tends to repeat itself, it reveals something new every day. We always observe a different part of the daily work of a fisherman, or see it from a different angle. This sense of conflict is heightened by contradictory motifs on-screen and in the voiceover. Words clash with images, the everyday with the extraordinary, space with time. “Maldonado is a fisherman of the Paraná River. Modern times leave him on a threshold: a way of inhabiting that no longer finds its possibilities. That frailty that cracks into his world is what we intent to film.”

The New Day

Gustavo Fontán
Argentina / 2016 / 62 min.
section: Opus Bonum
World Premiere
Did You Wonder Who Fired the Gun?
In 1946, S.E. Branch clearly shot Bill Spann, a black man, in Alabama. One story of many, it can be said, but this time it’s being unraveled by the great-nephew of the murderer through this political and aesthetically distinctive film essay. During the investigation, he constantly ran in to obstacles, due not only to the prevailing racism, but also the inevitable reflection of his own connection with history. A montage of black and white memories of places, endless drives through red sunsets, and agitating tunes brings the work together in the best southern Gothic tradition, in which “the past is never dead. It’s not even past.” (W. Faulkner)„This time I offered my love and my labor to a film that I wished somehow to be corrective. A film about the worst of my family.” T. Wilkerson

Did You Wonder Who Fired the Gun?

Travis Wilkerson
United States / 2017 / 90 min.
section: Opus Bonum
Central European Premiere
Ettrick
This visually captivating observational documentary of Scotland offers not only images of the rugged landscape, meadows, extensive forests and windmills, but also a detailed study of the meticulous handiwork completed at the local textile mill. Through exploring the nature of the digital record that captures the shape of the landscape, the film identifies images that reflect local everyday life. The physical movement through the area is also a journey into the imagery, which gradually disintegrates into particles of colour and shifting surfaces, subsequently reassembling back into the contours that change as a result of weather and time. Through the emphasis placed on colours and flow in calm compositions, the symbols of the traditional life in the region are revealed.DETAIL:“I shot the film three years long in Scotland. The path we drive leads to the heart of the Ettrick Forest, a dive into a textile world. A land where man, machinery and nature deal with a complex relationship that draws their future.” Jacques Perconte

Ettrick

Jacques Perconte
France / 2015 / 57 min.
section: Opus Bonum
Central European Premiere
Lost Paradise
The life of the filmmaker, also the film’s main character, is determined by a double fear. On one side, her world collapses under the weight of personal and historical tragedies, on the other she is threatened by the loss of the memories of everything that is dear to her. In this documentary, which blurs the lines between personal and public, she attempts to preserve all traces of memories, whether they’re images of her deceased husband or the ruins of local Beirut monuments. Slowly flowing images, virtually free of musical accompaniment, give memory fragments emerging from the surfaces of material things, including the heroine’s body, space to have spontaneous effect. "This film evolves around the notions of disappearance and loss: individual death and disappearance of places, loss of personal memory and collective memory. " R. Mitri

Lost Paradise

Reine Mitri
Lebanon / 2017 / 61 min.
section: Opus Bonum
International Premiere
Day 32
Face to face with the possible end of the world, the filmmaker collects cinematic records of human existence as a message to someone or something that will come after us. This documentary essay erects a monument to the inventiveness and destructiveness of man, and its collection of images from the history of culture, war and sports forms a kind of ark, ready to survive the deluge. The natural elements assault the screen with all their might. The almost poetic voiceover offers a testament of life: at once generic and deeply personal. The director’s awareness of the inevitable end compels him to engage on an enigmatic journey in search of the places, people and phenomena of our civilization. “Two things always moved me: the end of the world and the end of images. I didn’t know they could come together, and was far from imagining they would be related. That’s how Day 32 was born.” A. V. Almeida

Day 32

Andre Valentim Almeida
Portugal / 2017 / 85 min.
section: Opus Bonum
International Premiere
An Anthropological Television Myth
The recent history of Sicily is transformed into a kaleidoscopic disarray of images that rob television of its mythmaking potential. The film consists partially of scenes shot by a regional television station in the town of Catania between 1991 and 1994 – an era of important political change. The contrasting and unpredictable flow of images does not draw a map of these changes, but cuts up this map into a loose collage.

An Anthropological Television Myth

Maria Helene Bertino, Dario Castelli, Alessandro Gagliardo
Italy / 2011 / 54 min.
section: Opus Bonum
Czech Premiere
Vacancy
The camera observes an American motel along the main highway – just the way many of us imagine the United States. We follow four people inside the room at night, where they have been living in a kind of private purgatory for several years. Their sins are drugs, crime, and bad decisions. The slow flow of scenes and the occasionally blurred image create an atmosphere of being out of time and out of place – which probably just where these four people, incapable of breaking free from the vicious circle of apathy, feel themselves to be. The four documentary portraits combine to form a picture of the depressing life of people nurturing a tiny flame of hope. „,I have been to hell and / back. / And let me / tell you / It was / wonderful‘ (from Louise Bourgeois work)“ A. Kandy Longuet

Vacancy

Alexandra Kandy Longuet
Belgium / 2018 / 80 min.
section: Opus Bonum
World Premiere
Albertine Gone
This updating of the sixth part of In Search of Lost Time explores the current identity of Proust’s book. Through a staged docu-fictions with elements of performance art, the filmmaker strips the text, quoted by an employee of a fire station, of its period references, thus giving it new attributes. Since 1993, Véronique Aubouy has been filming people reading various parts of Proust’s masterpiece of literature. The planned date of completion for her monumental project, which sees the protagonist as an object in a cinematic landscape and the book as a signpost of various interpretations, is in 2050."Since my discovery of Proust’s Recherche I'm convinced  that this book is an expression of the Here and now. When I met Jean, fireman, nurse anaesthetist who had read la Recherche during his night guards, the film was there, here and now." V. Aubouy

Albertine Gone

Véronique Aubouy
France / 2018 / 34 min.
section: Opus Bonum
International Premiere
Ministerstvo kultury
Fond kinematografie
Evropská unie
Město Jihlava
Kraj Vysočina
Česká televize
Český rozhlas
Aktuálně.cz
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