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24th Ji.hlava International Documentary Film Festival

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ALONE
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ALONE
ALONE
ALONE
ALONE
ALONE

ALONE

director: Otakar Faifr
original title: SAMA
country: Czech Republic
year: 2017
running time: 63 min.

synopsis

Luba Skořepová has spent the past several years in solitude, struggling to stay an active theatre actress as long as she can. She invited the film crew into her home in order to shoot her daily life. Although the resulting film contains archival footage from her youth, it is definitely not a biographical film. The filmmakers focus on the present day, capturing scenes from the life of an old and solitary woman who possesses the will to live an active life but who is no longer important for others. Skořepová herself was behind the making of the film, through which she hopes to call attention to the subject of loneliness among old people.

“Luba wanted to film Alone in order to call attention to the subject of loneliness among old people. I am convinced that we have succeeded.” O. Faifr

biography

Debuting director Otakar Faifr (1980) previously worked in theatre himself. He is a co-founder of Geisslers Hofcomoedianten, which produces comedies inspired by baroque tradition and where he worked as dramaturge, producer and actor. Alone, shot in collaboration with Luba Skořepová, was funded by the Taťána Kuchařová Foundation – Beauty of Help and through crowdfunding.

more about film

director: Otakar Faifr
cast: Luba Skořepová
producer: Michal Novák, Otakar Faifr, Michal Rykovský, Věra Krincvajová, Anna Miklošová
script: Otakar Faifr
photography: Otakar Faifr
editing: Michal Novák
music: Jana Kirschner, Lumír Hrma
sound: Lumír Hrma, Martin Novák

other films in the section

Bo Hai
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Bo Hai

Dužan Duong
Czech Republic / 2017 / 26 min.
section: Czech Joy
World Premiere
Why Do I Feel Like A Boy?
In a small village in the southern Czech Highlands, the director meets with sixteen-year-old Ben to examine the issue of defining his identity in person: Ben is living in a girl’s body, but feels like a boy. With his real feelings, he flees into the online world and truly feels happy, for example, when using greenscreen technology to participate in Prague Pride. The film indirectly captures the (mis)understanding and (un)acceptance he meets with at school and his focused insight is completed by interviews conducted by the director with his mother and sister, who involuntarily embody everything that Ben hates about himself. “What I like about it the most is how the story of a teenage transgender boy can disrupt the conservative structures of a television film, go beyond the media, and challenge the inhumane sterilization of transgender people in the Czech Republic.” K. Turečková    
personal program

Why Do I Feel Like A Boy?

Kateřina Turečková
Czech Republic / 2019 / 26 min.
section: Czech Joy
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The End of Light
On a most real stage of all, a director of this hybrid film lets an unreal story flow. While Croatian nationalists stage a protest in front of the Rijeka theatre against its art director Oliver Frljić (a well-known figure to Czechs, among others), on a nearby island of Goli otok, amateur actors rehearse a surrealistic performance. Dilapidated buildings of a former concentration camp, secretly erected by Tito’s régime to hold political prisoners, serve as props of a Lynch-like scene in which smeared-faced actors become objects in the waxworks of their own dreams. The world of imagination and the world of bleak reality start moving away from each other.“Call to me and I will answer you and tell you great and unsearchable things you do not know. Jeremiah 33:3” A. Suk

The End of Light

Aleš Suk
Croatia / 2018 / 62 min.
section: Czech Joy
World Premiere
Dunaj of Consciousness
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personal program

Dunaj of Consciousness

David Butula
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section: Czech Joy
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Good Mr. Benda
A sensitive portrait of grandfather Miroslav Benda, a tried and true Sokol member and an ordinary man with extraordinary vigor and ideals, revealing a story of human resilience and optimism through nostalgia and situational comedy. The film is a kind of observational documentary - it includes family videos and archival film material. We’re drawn into the microcosm of the village of Křenovice u Slavkova by two Japanese women who have decided to visit Benda, thanks to his long friendship with a university professor from Tokyo. Together with Benda, the audience travels to the only Japanese gas station in Europe, to Prague’s Strahov Stadium, and to New York to visit American Sokol members. “Old Mr. Benda fascinates me with his ability to elevate banality to a feast; he is like a Zen master who was asked about the meaning of life and said: ‘When you want to eat, eat; when you want to sleep, sleep.’” P. Jurda

Good Mr. Benda

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section: Czech Joy
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Solos for Members of Parliament
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Solos for Members of Parliament

Tereza Bernátková
Czech Republic / 2018 / 34 min.
section: Czech Joy
World Premiere
Skokan
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Skokan

Petr Václav
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section: Czech Joy
World Premiere
The Last Shift of Thomas Hisem
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The Last Shift of Thomas Hisem

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section: Czech Joy
World Premiere
Nekyia: Inner portrait of the poet Hradecky
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personal program

Nekyia: Inner portrait of the poet Hradecky

Albert Hospodářský
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section: Czech Joy
World Premiere
Peasant Common Sense
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Peasant Common Sense

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section: Czech Joy
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We Can Do Better

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Moravia, O Fair Land III.

Petr Šprincl
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section: Czech Joy
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